Biomarker for identifying colon cance

Carbohydrate biomarker could prevent unnecessary breast cancer treatment

Imaging with new biomarker tracks tumor progression

Biomarkers will allow determining cancer treatment strategies

Biomarkers that help researchers detect cancer (lat. Carcinoma) earlier was developed by scientists from Northwestern University. The main mission of the research is to identify biomarkers of the interplay of genes and environment in cancer. Precision medicine considers each individual’s genetic and environmental factors to determine treatment strategies. Also known as personalized medicine, this field rejects the idea that one drug or treatment works for all patients. Lifang Hou, a professor of preventive medicine and chief of cancer epidemiology and prevention at the Feinberg School of Medicine, focused on cancer biomarkers - biological indicators of the disease - in blood. Blood-based biomarkers, she says, will allow for simpler, lower-cost tests that can be deployed in physicians’ offices during routine check-ups. Equally important: These biomarkers are indisputable.

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2018.10.05

The new neuroimaging tool reveales a biomarker of Alzheimer’s

The biomarker that detects signs of Alzheimer's disease (lat. Morbus Alzheimerianus, AD) was developed by scientists by the University of Zagreb. The worldwide increase of AD, a long-lasting morbid type of dementia, is currently one of the biggest global public health challenges. A wealth of evidence emerged during over more than 110 years of disease research suggest that the pathological changes associated with AD start decades before the onset of clinical symptoms. This long progression of neurodegeneration is irreversible by the stage of symptomatic disease, which may account for failure to develop successful disease modifying therapies. Currently, there is a pressing worldwide search for a marker of very early, possibly reversible, pathological changes related to AD in cognitively intact individuals, before the occurrence of the first symptoms (pre-clinical).

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2018.10.05

Study shows biomarker panel boosts lung cancer risk assessment for smokers

A four-protein biomarker blood (lat. Sanguis) test improves lung cancer (lat. Carcinoma) risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon smoking history, capturing risk for people who have ever smoked, not only for heavy smokers, has been developed by the researchers at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. This simple blood test demonstrates the potential of biomarker-based risk assessment to improve eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography. The biomarker panel achieved superior sensitivity - identification of smokers who later developed lung cancer - without increasing false-positives compared to guidelines for screening approved by the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) for heavy smokers based on age and smoking history.

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2018.10.05

Hemophilia A Inhibitor Study

Disruptive technology for the treatment of hemophilia

New test helps identify particles for gene delivery or RNA interference

Prophylaxis with a SHL-rFVIII therapy can help boys with severe haemophilia A

A group of Canadian researchers recently published findings from a clinical study on the use of prophylaxis with a standard half-life recombinant factor VIII (SHL-rFVIII) therapy to treat boys with severe haemophilia A (lat. hemophilia). They investigated an approach to prophylactic therapy in which patients began by receiving weekly infusions of SHL-rFVIII and ultimately transition to 'tailored frequency-escalated prophylaxis.' The lead investigator of the study was Professor Brian M Feldman, MD of the Division of Rheumatology at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. A total of 56 boys with severe hemophilia from 12 Canadian treatment centres were included in the study.

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2018.10.04

New study demonstrates a potential for reducing factor VIII inhibitors in haemophilia A

According to the National Hemophilia Foundation, Hemophilia A, also called factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency or classic haemophilia (lat. hemophilia), is a genetic disorder caused by missing or defective factor VIII, a clotting protein. Although it is passed down from parents to children, about 1/3 of cases are caused by a spontaneous mutation, a change in a gene. However, the scientific team at the Emory University School of Medicine has made an important discovery that could potentially change the way doctors understand and treat inhibitor development in haemophilia A. They found that MZ B cells play a critical role in initiating FVIII inhibitor formation and suggest a potential strategy to prevent anti-FVIII alloantibody formation in patients with haemophilia A.

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2018.10.04

Tiny bubbles of gene therapy may help treat hemophilia

Tiny bubbles of gene therapy, which can may help treat hemophilia (lat. Haemophilia, also spelt as hemophilia) were developed by researchers at the Center for Cardiovascular Research at the University of Hawaii. Burns School of Medicine. Scientists hope that patients with hemophilia could one day be treated with gene therapy delivered by tiny bubbles. The microbubbles are made of lipid molecules that won’t dissolve in water. The bubbles are made with DNA that expresses therapeutic genes, and are then injected into the bloodstream. As the bubbles pass through the liver, a beam of ultrasound pops them, and the DNA is deposited in the liver cells, where it makes the missing clotting factor. Hemophilia is an attractive target for gene replacement therapy because the disease results from a single gene mutation, and low levels of the normal protein can restore clotting function.

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2018.10.04

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