New gene therapy technique for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Viral gene therapy could improve results from breast reconstruction after cancer treatment

Gene Therapy Shown to Remove Core Component of Parkinson’s Disease

Robust and specific gene regulation tool developed for primary brain neurons

A powerful new tool is available for neuroscience investigation into brain development, the mechanisms of memory and learning, and the role of brain dysregulation in neuropsychiatric diseases (lat. Morbo neuropsychiatric) like addiction, depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. This molecular biology tool - developed and validated by the University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers - is able to selectively and robustly turn on genes in neurons. It has been delivered to neurons growing in a dish, and more importantly, it has also been delivered to brain neurons in living adult rats. The tool can increase the expression of a single gene or the expression of multiple genes at the same time, and the amount of increased gene expression can be controlled.

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9 days ago

Scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer

The study of Rutgers University (RutUni) has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study identified the NSD2 gene through a computer algorithm developed to determine which cancer genes that spread in a mouse model were most relevant to humans. The researchers were able to turn off the gene in the mice tumor cells, which significantly decreased cancer’s spread.

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9 days ago

Biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. Researchers say that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations.

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10 days ago

Significant discovery in the fight against drug-resistant tuberculosis

Androgen affects the risk of being affected by prostate cancer

A new antibiotic could be a better, faster treatment for tuberculosis

Biomarker discovery offers hope for new Tuberculosis vaccine

A team of scientists led by Oxford University has made a discovery that could improve the chances of developing an effective vaccine against Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis). The researchers have identified new biomarkers for Tuberculosis (TB) which have shown for the first time why immunity from the widely used Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is so variable. The biomarkers will also provide valuable clues to assess whether potential new vaccines could be effective. TB remains one of the world's major killer diseases, infecting 9.6 million people and killing 1.5 million in 2014. The only available vaccine, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), works well to prevent severe disease in children but is very variable in how well it protects against lung disease, particularly in countries where TB is most common.

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10 days ago

The novel biomarker for prostate cancer patients

The new biomarker to better forecast prognosis for prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) patients was discovered by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center (TAMHSC) Institute of Biosciences and Technology in Houston. They have identified a biomarker that will aid in more accurately determining the prognosis for prostate cancer patients, a finding that could have further implications for anti-cancer drug discovery and ultimately, cancer prevention. The study was led by Leyuan Liu, Ph.D., assistant professor with the institute’s Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology.

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11 days ago

Precision immunoprofiling could help reduce latent tuberculosis infection

New diagnostic tools such as machine learning and precision medicine could help identify tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) patients with the highest risk of reactivation of the disease, according to a new University of Michigan (UniMich) study. A team of researchers is showing that identifying multiple biomarkers can provide a more accurate diagnosis for patients. A multi-array test can provide a more detailed, disease-specific glimpse into a patient’s infection and likely outcome. Using a precision medicine approach reveals previously obscured diagnostic signatures and reactivation risk potential. Latent tuberculosis infection affects nearly 2 billion individuals around the world and about 10 percent of those cases result in active tuberculosis. The reactivation from latency can happen anytime and the mechanism for it is not well-understood.

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11 days ago

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