Laser-targeted removal of prostate tumors

Predicting and preventing prostate cancer spread

Prostate cancer biomarkers were identified in seminal fluid

Small liquid sensor may detect prostate cancer instantly

The researcher from the University of Missouri (UniMiss) is developing a tiny sensor, known as an acoustic resonant sensor, that is smaller than a human hair and could test bodily fluids for a variety of diseases, including breast and prostate cancers (lat. Prostate Carcinoma). According to Jae Kwon, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at MU, many disease-related substances in liquids are not easily tracked. In a liquid environment, most sensors experience a significant loss of signal quality, but by using highly sensitive, low-signal-loss acoustic resonant sensors in a liquid, these substances can be effectively and quickly detected — a brand-new concept that will result in a noninvasive approach for breast and prostate cancer detection.

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2019.03.29

Researchers optimize gene editing for SCD and beta thalassemia

A new strategy to treat two of the most common inherited blood diseases - sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia - applying CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to patients' own blood stem cells has been developed by the researchers at Children's Hospital Boston. This approach overcomes prior technical challenges, editing blood stem cells more efficiently than in the past. The two studies show that the gene-edited cells generate genetically corrected red blood cells producing functional hemoglobin. This work defines a strategy that could lead to a cure for common hemoglobin disorders. Combining gene editing with an autologous stem-cell transplant could be a therapy for sickle-cell disease, beta-thalassemia, and other blood disorders. Together, sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia affect 332,000 conceptions or births worldwide each year, according to the World Health Organization. Both diseases involve mutations in the gene for beta globin protein.

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2019.03.29

A Computer Model to Predict Prostate Cancer Progression

An international team of cancer researchers from Denmark, the University of Copenhagen (UCopenhagen), and Germany, the German Cancer Research Center, have used cancer patient data to develop a computer model that can predict the course of disease for prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma). The model is currently being implemented at a prostate cancer clinic in Germany. The researchers have also found the enzyme that appears to trigger some of the first mutations in prostate cancer. The team studied the earliest mutational events in prostate cancer to develop a computer model. The researchers collected patient data from close to 300 men who have had their entire cancer genome sequenced to characterise all mutations present in the tumour. Based on the data set, the researchers have developed the computer model which can be used to predict how prostate cancer will develop for a given patient. The computer model is currently being implemented at a clinic in Germany. 

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2019.03.29

A drug delivery technique to bypass blood-brain barrier

New test brings faster tuberculosis diagnosis to rural South Africa

A new compound may be effective against a wide range of bacterial diseases

A new prostate cancer cell detection method

Prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) is one of the male-killing diseases and early detection of prostate cancer is the key for better treatment and lower cost. However, the number of prostate cancer cells is low at an early stage, therefore, it is very challenging to detect. In this study, a researchers group, including scientists from the Center for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, designed and developed upconversion immune-nanohybrids (UINBs) with sustainable stability in a physiological environment, stable optical properties and highly specific targeting capability for early-stage prostate cancer cell detection. The developed UINBs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and luminescence spectroscopy. The targeting function of the biotinylated antibody nanohybrids was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis. 

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2019.03.28

Experimental Drug Delivers One-Two Punch to Prostate Cancer Cells

An experimental drug that targets abnormally high levels of a protein linked to cancer growth appears to significantly reduce the proliferation of prostate cancer cells in laboratory cell cultures and animals, while also making these cells considerably more vulnerable to radiation, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins scientists. The findings could advance the search for novel combination treatments that make more effective and safer use of radiation against prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma), the most common nonskin cancer in men. The team had earlier discovered that a protein called DDX3 appears to be 'dysregulated' in many cancers, including breast, lung, colorectal, sarcoma and prostate. The researchers found that the more aggressive cancer, the higher the expression of this protein, which helps maintain cellular stability. The researchers then developed a molecule referred to as RK-33 that was designed to disrupt DDX3’s function by locking on to a portion of the protein.     

 

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2019.03.28

Ancient Chinese malaria remedy fights TB

A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. In a promising study led by Robert Abramovitch, a Michigan State University microbiologist and TB expert, the ancient remedy artemisinin stopped the ability of TB-causing bacteria, known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to become dormant. This stage of the disease often makes the use of antibiotics ineffective. When TB bacteria are dormant, they become highly tolerant to antibiotics. Blocking dormancy makes the TB bacteria more sensitive to these drugs and could shorten treatment times. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mtb, needs oxygen to thrive in the body. The immune system starves this bacterium of oxygen to control the infection. The team found that artemisinin attacks a molecule called heme, which is found in the Mtb oxygen sensor. 

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2019.03.28

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