Robo Mechanism in the treatment of neuropathological conditions and cancer

Blood-based biomarkers could enable simple, accurate TB tests for diagnosis and monitoring

Experimental TB protection delivered through a spray instead of a shot

A protein that may signal more aggressive prostate cancers

A biomarker that may be a potentially important breakthrough in diagnosing and treating prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) has been discovered by the researchers at the University of Michigan (UniMich). Biomarkers in the body are analogous to the warning lights in cars that signal something might need repairing. In human bodies, they indicate if something’s wrong or if people are about to get sick or if people are predisposed to certain illnesses. The researchers recently discovered a biomarker that they believe achieves this differentiation. Prostate cancer can grow so slowly the carrier dies of natural causes before the cancer spreads, but the deadly form progresses very rapidly.

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16 days ago

A new target to treat prostate cancer

The drug Gefitinib is used to treat breast, lung, and other cancers by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling, but it has only a limited effect on prostate cancer. EGFR, present on the cell membrane, is involved in cell proliferation and the development of dermis, lung, and digestive tissues. When a mutation causes its over-activation, it can lead to increased cell proliferation and tumour formation. However, a group of scientists at the Hokkaido University, trying to get the unknown regulation mechanism in the EGFR pathway, uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumour-promoting signalling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma). This study was supported in part by a grant-in-aid for scientific research from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) of Japan.

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16 days ago

Researchers uncover the potential key to curing tuberculosis

Researchers at Iowa State University (UIowa) have identified an enzyme that helps make tuberculosis resistant to a human's natural defense system. Researchers have also found a method to possibly neutralize that enzyme, which may someday lead to a cure for tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is a contagious disease that is on the rise, killing 1.5 to 2 million people worldwide annually. Reuben Peters, associate professor in the department of biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, is leading the team of scientists from Iowa State; the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, that is attempting to find ways to minimize the disease. 

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16 days ago

The scientists set sights on glaucoma medication to treat TB

A novel pathway for a mucosal TB vaccine

Researchers discover two new ways to kill tuberculosis

A new effective therapy for treating men with prostate cancer

A new UCLA-led study led Dr. Amar Kishan, shows that men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) can safely undergo higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time and still have the same, successful outcomes as from a much longer course of treatment. This type of radiation, known as stereotactic body radiotherapy, is a form of external beam radiation therapy and reduces the duration of treatment from 45 days to four to five days. The approach has been in use since 2000 but has not yet been widely adopted because of concerns over how safe and effective this approach would be in the long term.

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17 days ago

Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment

Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis, TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2017, 10 million people around the world fell ill with TB and 1.3 million died. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes TB in humans. Its genome holds 80 so-called toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems: sets of closely linked genes that encode both a toxic protein and an antitoxin: a toxin-neutralizing antidote. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg investigated this promising feature for therapeutic targets.

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17 days ago

The better way to fight treatment-resistant prostate cancer

A new study at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. If confirmed in humans, they could lead to more effective ways to control certain aggressive types of prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma), the second-leading cause of cancer death for men in the U.S. Men whose prostate cancer tumors are localized typically survive many years after diagnosis, whether they have surgery, radiation therapy or no treatment at all. But for a minority of men whose cancer spreads to other parts of the body and resists hormone therapy, the prognosis is poor, with fewer than a third surviving five years after diagnosis. More than 29,000 men in the U.S. die from prostate cancer each year, according to the American Cancer Society.

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17 days ago

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