Cancer drug helps treat tuberculosis by restoring leaky blood vessels

Artificial Intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas

The new tool to advance prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

New treatment may have fewer side effects than traditional cancer therapy

Currently, large doses of chemotherapy are required when treating certain forms of cancer, resulting in toxic side effects. The chemicals enter the body and work to destroy or shrink the tumor, but also harm vital organs and drastically affect bodily functions. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri (UniMiss) have proven that a new form of prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) treatment that uses radioactive gold nanoparticles, and was developed at MU, is safe to use in dogs. Sandra Axiak-Bechtel, an assistant professor in oncology at the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, says that this is a big step for gold nanoparticle research.

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2019.03.27

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing

Technology being developed at Washington State University (WashStUni) provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) and tracking the disease’s progression. The innovative filter-like device isolates prostate cancer indicators from other cellular information in blood and urine. It could enable doctors to determine how cancer patients are responding to different treatments without needing to perform invasive biopsies. Washington State University research team fitted a mat of tiny glass springs with specially designed biomarkers that attract the fatty droplets of proteins and RNA that tumor cells shed into body fluids. The droplets, called exosomes, contain genetic information that can be analyzed to determine cancer’s molecular composition, even how far it has advanced.

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2019.03.27

Human gene therapy in a model of the rare metabolic disorder

Researchers are closer to finding a better way to treat children with a rare metabolic disorder called MPS I. It is caused by a deficiency of the key enzyme IDUA needed to break down complex sugars in cells. MPS I eventually leads to the abnormal accumulation of sugar debris and cell death. The two main treatments are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy; however, both are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease enters the central nervous system (lat. Systematis nervosi centralis, CNS).

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2019.03.18

Acticule: a treatment of infectious diseases

A new method to regain sight with the help of gene therapy

A new class of potential anti-tuberculosis drugs

Bioengineering Team's 'Circuit' Work May Benefit Gene Therapy

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTDallas) have designed genetic 'circuits' out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements. Tyler Quarton, a bioengineering graduate student, and Dr. Leonidas Bleris, associate professor of bioengineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, hope their work has a big impact on synthetic biology and gene therapy. Every living cell contains a compilation of genes, which serves as the blueprint for all the biological activity within a cell. The team explains this system by comparing genes to musicians. 

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2019.03.18

Experimental Drug Stops Parkinson’s Disease Progression in Mice

An experimental drug, similar to compounds used to treat diabetes, that slows the progression of Parkinson’s disease itself - as well as its symptoms - in mice has been developed by the researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In experiments performed with cultures of human brain cells and live mouse models, they report the drug blocked the degradation of brain cells that is the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (lat. Parkinson scriptor morbus). The drug is expected to move to clinical trials last year. If planned clinical trials for the drug, named NLY01, are successful in humans, it could be one of the first treatments to directly target the progression of Parkinson’s disease, not just the muscle rigidity, spasmodic movements, fatigue, dizziness, dementia and other symptoms of the disorder.

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2019.03.15

Potential cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, according to the new research from the University of Illinois. Cystic fibrosis is a lifelong disease that makes patients vulnerable to lung infections. There are treatments for some but not all patients, and there is no cure. The drug restored infection-fighting properties in lung tissue donated by human patients as well as in pigs with cystic fibrosis. It has potential to become the first treatment to address all types of cystic fibrosis, regardless of the genetic mutation that causes the protein deficiency.

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2019.03.15

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