Skin cream could be made from own skin

South American amphibian cells could potentially cure cirrhosis of human liver

Skin vaccination with microneedle patch instead of injections

The drug for unrelated disease may help to treat aggressive form of cancer

Understanding the nature of how Leukemia cells infiltrate bone marrow, where blood cells are created, the team of researchers from Imperial College London has found that the form of cancer is known as Leukemia (lat. Leucaemiae) might be treated with the drug from iron overload that is already approved for human use. Such crucial discovery makes possible to treat the incurable form of the most aggressive cancer with already existing medicine which has a protective effect on the blood vessels allowing to rescue the healthy blood stem cells and to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy.

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26 days ago

Curing colon cancer without harmful side effects

The treatment of colon cancer with the help of nuclear medicine was discovered by specialists of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and MIT. Research is always going on in the area of colorectal cancer. Colon cancer treatments were not available 10 years ago. Research is ongoing all the time, scientists are looking for the causes and methods of preventing colorectal cancer, as well as the best ways to detect it early and ways to improve treatment. Currently, scientists discovered a treatment that can save lives. This treatment has a three-stage system that uses nuclear medicine to target and eliminates colorectal cancer. Scientists have achieved in the experience on mice a 100-percent level of cure without harmful side effects for the body.

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26 days ago

Heart tissue on spinach leaves as a solution for bioengineering problem

A heart tissue on spinach leaves was grown by the researchers from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. They turn to the vascular system of plants to solve a major bioengineering problem blocking the regeneration of human tissues and organs. Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues, bones, even whole organs to implant in people to treat disease or traumatic injuries: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood (lat. Sanguis) deep into the developing tissue. 

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26 days ago

Advanced version of the Pneumonia Vaccine

Using graphene to detect ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases

New drugs restore memory loss and prolong life

Eye conditions provide new lens for screening for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s (lat. morbus Alzheimerianus) disease is difficult to diagnose as well as treat,  but researchers now have a promising new screening tool using the window to the brain. A study of 3,877 randomly selected patients found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases – age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma – and Alzheimer’s disease. The results offer physicians a new way to detect those at higher risk of this disorder, which causes memory loss and other symptoms of cognitive decline. The research was conducted by the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSM), the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Institute and the UW School of Nursing.

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26 days ago

Brainvectis develops a therapy that restores a brain cholesterol metabolism

Cholesterol is a fundamental compound of the brain which contributes to all the basic processes of cognition such as a learning and memory. Brain cholesterol metabolism is impaired in neurodegenerative diseases. However, Brainvectis is focused on the development of the therapies that can restore brain cholesterol metabolism in order to treat neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's diseases and Alzheimer's diseases. Brainvectis studies the processes of the restoration of brain cholesterol metabolism by increasing CYP46A1 in the patients' brains. The company was founded by Nathalie Cartier Lacave in 2015. It is based in Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

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26 days ago

New treatment and prevention approaches for Alzheimer’s disease

Mitchel A. Kling, MD, an associate professor of Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (UP) and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, discovered that reduced levels of plasmalogens - a class of lipids created in the liver that are integral to cell membranes in the brain - are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (lat. morbus Alzheimerianus). Plasmalogens are created in the liver and are dispersed through the bloodstream in the form of lipoproteins, which also transport cholesterol and other lipids to and from cells and tissues throughout the body, including the brain. Scientists developed three indices for measuring the amount of these lipids related to cognition, in order to identify whether reduced levels in the bloodstream are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), overall cognitive function, and/or other biomarkers of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease.

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26 days ago

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