Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice

Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development

Researchers identify brain protein crucial to recovery from stroke

Reducing the burden of tuberculosis treatment

Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases: One-third of the world’s population is infected with TB, and more than 1 million people die from the disease every year. One reason TB is so pervasive is that treatment requires a six-month course of daily antibiotics, which is difficult for about half of all patients to adhere to, especially in rural areas with limited access to medical facilities. To help overcome that, a team of researchers led by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MassInstTech) has devised a new way to deliver antibiotics, which they hope will make it easier to cure more patients and reduce health care costs. Using this new approach, a coiled wire loaded with antibiotics is inserted into the patient’s stomach through a nasogastric tube. Once in the stomach, the device slowly releases antibiotics over one month, eliminating the need for patients to take pills every day.

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2019.03.15

Treatment more common neurological diseases

Researchers from Shinshu University (ShinUni) have reported for the first time the mechanism behind a very rare brain syndrome called disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH), which causes microcephaly. Information gleaned from this animal study could also inform research into other, more common neurological diseases (lat. Neurological morbis) such as mental retardation, epilepsy and autism. MICPCH only affects a total of 53 females and seven males worldwide. It is characterized by several developmental symptoms including small head size, slowed growth, cognitive delays, epilepsy, seizures, vision and hearing problems, decreased muscle tone, and autism. MICPCH is linked to irregularities, or mutations, on the X chromosome that eventually lead to the chromosome's inactivation. 

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2019.03.15

New gene therapy technique for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

A therapeutic technique to transplant blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells directly into the brain that could herald a revolution in the approach to treating central nervous system diseases and neurodegenerative disorders has been developed by the researchers at Children's Hospital Boston. The technique could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain. In their study, the team tested the technique in a mouse model to treat lysosomal storage disorders, a group of severe metabolic disorders that affect the central nervous system. 

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2019.03.14

Viral gene therapy could improve results from breast reconstruction after cancer treatment

Gene Therapy Shown to Remove Core Component of Parkinson’s Disease

Robust and specific gene regulation tool developed for primary brain neurons

Scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer

The study of Rutgers University (RutUni) has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study identified the NSD2 gene through a computer algorithm developed to determine which cancer genes that spread in a mouse model were most relevant to humans. The researchers were able to turn off the gene in the mice tumor cells, which significantly decreased cancer’s spread.

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2019.03.14

Biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. Researchers say that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations.

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2019.03.13

Significant discovery in the fight against drug-resistant tuberculosis

A naturally occurring antibiotic that may help in the fight against drug-resistant Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) has been identified by the scientists at Newcastle University (NewcastleUni). Each year, approximately 10 million people fall ill with Tuberculosis (TB) and around 1.7 million die from the devastating disease worldwide. One of the main antibiotics for TB is rifampicin, however, many strains of the Tuberculosis-causing bacteria - Mycobacterium tuberculosis - have developed resistance to it. Approximately 600,000 people every year are diagnosed with rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis. Now researchers from Newcastle University and Demuris Ltd have identified that a naturally occurring antibiotic, called kanglemycin A - related to the antibiotic rifampicin - is active against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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2019.03.13

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