Androgen affects the risk of being affected by prostate cancer

A new antibiotic could be a better, faster treatment for tuberculosis

Biomarker discovery offers hope for new Tuberculosis vaccine

The novel biomarker for prostate cancer patients

The new biomarker to better forecast prognosis for prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) patients was discovered by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center (TAMHSC) Institute of Biosciences and Technology in Houston. They have identified a biomarker that will aid in more accurately determining the prognosis for prostate cancer patients, a finding that could have further implications for anti-cancer drug discovery and ultimately, cancer prevention. The study was led by Leyuan Liu, Ph.D., assistant professor with the institute’s Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology.

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2019.03.12

Precision immunoprofiling could help reduce latent tuberculosis infection

New diagnostic tools such as machine learning and precision medicine could help identify tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) patients with the highest risk of reactivation of the disease, according to a new University of Michigan (UniMich) study. A team of researchers is showing that identifying multiple biomarkers can provide a more accurate diagnosis for patients. A multi-array test can provide a more detailed, disease-specific glimpse into a patient’s infection and likely outcome. Using a precision medicine approach reveals previously obscured diagnostic signatures and reactivation risk potential. Latent tuberculosis infection affects nearly 2 billion individuals around the world and about 10 percent of those cases result in active tuberculosis. The reactivation from latency can happen anytime and the mechanism for it is not well-understood.

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2019.03.11

Robo Mechanism in the treatment of neuropathological conditions

During brain development, billions of neuron nerve cells must find their accurate pathway in the brain in order to form trillions of neuronal circuits enabling us to enjoy cognitive, sensory and emotional wellbeing. To achieve this remarkable precision, migrating neurons use special protein receptors that sense the environment around them and guide the way so these neurons and their long extensions stay on the right path and avoid faulty turns. Rare defects in these neuronal guidance proteins can result in severe neurological conditions such as ataxia and epilepsy. Bar-Ilan University researchers led by Professor Yarden Opatowsky intricate molecular mechanism that allows the guidance receptor "Robo" to react to signals in its environment while avoiding premature activity that can lead to harmful outcomes.

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2019.03.11

Blood-based biomarkers could enable simple, accurate TB tests for diagnosis and monitoring

Experimental TB protection delivered through a spray instead of a shot

A protein that may signal more aggressive prostate cancers

A new target to treat prostate cancer

The drug Gefitinib is used to treat breast, lung, and other cancers by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling, but it has only a limited effect on prostate cancer. EGFR, present on the cell membrane, is involved in cell proliferation and the development of dermis, lung, and digestive tissues. When a mutation causes its over-activation, it can lead to increased cell proliferation and tumour formation. However, a group of scientists at the Hokkaido University, trying to get the unknown regulation mechanism in the EGFR pathway, uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumour-promoting signalling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma). This study was supported in part by a grant-in-aid for scientific research from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) of Japan.

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2019.03.07

Researchers uncover the potential key to curing tuberculosis

Researchers at Iowa State University (UIowa) have identified an enzyme that helps make tuberculosis resistant to a human's natural defense system. Researchers have also found a method to possibly neutralize that enzyme, which may someday lead to a cure for tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is a contagious disease that is on the rise, killing 1.5 to 2 million people worldwide annually. Reuben Peters, associate professor in the department of biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, is leading the team of scientists from Iowa State; the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, that is attempting to find ways to minimize the disease. 

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2019.03.07

The scientists set sights on glaucoma medication to treat TB

A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis), even the drug-resistant kind. Robert Abramovitch, an MSU microbiologist, along with graduate student Benjamin Johnson who helped lead the study, have discovered that ethoxzolamide, a sulfa-based compound found in many prescription glaucoma drugs, actually turns off the bacterium’s ability to invade the immune system. TB may not have eyes and ears, but it has the uncanny ability to sense certain environmental cues in the body and adapt. One of these cues includes the infection’s ability to detect pH - or acidity levels - which tells the disease it’s being attacked by a host immune cell.

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2019.03.07

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