Prostate cancer biomarkers were identified in seminal fluid

Small liquid sensor may detect prostate cancer instantly

Researchers optimize gene editing for SCD and beta thalassemia

A Computer Model to Predict Prostate Cancer Progression

An international team of cancer researchers from Denmark, the University of Copenhagen (UCopenhagen), and Germany, the German Cancer Research Center, have used cancer patient data to develop a computer model that can predict the course of disease for prostate cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma). The model is currently being implemented at a prostate cancer clinic in Germany. The researchers have also found the enzyme that appears to trigger some of the first mutations in prostate cancer. The team studied the earliest mutational events in prostate cancer to develop a computer model. The researchers collected patient data from close to 300 men who have had their entire cancer genome sequenced to characterise all mutations present in the tumour. Based on the data set, the researchers have developed the computer model which can be used to predict how prostate cancer will develop for a given patient. The computer model is currently being implemented at a clinic in Germany. 

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2019.03.29

A drug delivery technique to bypass blood-brain barrier

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have successfully prevented the development of Parkinson's disease (lat. Parkinson scriptor morbus) in a mouse using new techniques to deliver drugs across the naturally impenetrable blood-brain barrier. Their findings lend hope to patients around the world with neurological conditions that are difficult to treat due to a barrier mechanism that prevents approximately 98 percent of drugs from reaching the brain and central nervous system (lat. Neurological morbis). The team is currently looking at neurodegenerative disease, there is potential for the technology to be expanded to psychiatric diseases, chronic pain, seizure disorders and many other conditions affecting the brain and nervous system (lat. systematis nervosi centralis) down the road. Using nasal mucosal grafting, researchers delivered glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a therapeutic protein in testing for treating Parkinson's disease, to the brains of mice. 

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2019.03.28

New test brings faster tuberculosis diagnosis to rural South Africa

The new test that works quickly and in places with few of the amenities - even seemingly basic ones like refrigeration - has been developed by the researchers at Stanford University. Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis), a distant memory to most Americans, remains a serious public health threat in developing countries, in part because the most common test for the disease was developed a century ago and is not the most reliable. Now, a team of basic chemists working in collaboration with doctors and public health researchers in South Africa has developed a new test that makes it easier to diagnose and therefore treat the disease. Professor Carolyn Bertozzi and her lab have been studying tuberculosis for 20 years. Among their most important discoveries was that of a special sugar molecule, called trehalose, that only living tuberculosis bacteria consume and that other bacteria eschew.

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2019.03.28

A new compound may be effective against a wide range of bacterial diseases

A new prostate cancer cell detection method

Experimental Drug Delivers One-Two Punch to Prostate Cancer Cells

Ancient Chinese malaria remedy fights TB

A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. In a promising study led by Robert Abramovitch, a Michigan State University microbiologist and TB expert, the ancient remedy artemisinin stopped the ability of TB-causing bacteria, known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to become dormant. This stage of the disease often makes the use of antibiotics ineffective. When TB bacteria are dormant, they become highly tolerant to antibiotics. Blocking dormancy makes the TB bacteria more sensitive to these drugs and could shorten treatment times. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mtb, needs oxygen to thrive in the body. The immune system starves this bacterium of oxygen to control the infection. The team found that artemisinin attacks a molecule called heme, which is found in the Mtb oxygen sensor. 

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2019.03.28

Cancer drug helps treat tuberculosis by restoring leaky blood vessels

An FDA-approved drug designed to treat cancer helps fight tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) in mouse models, according to the researchers at Duke University (DukeUni). The drug is an MMP inhibitor designed to increase the structural integrity of blood vessels in tumors so that other drugs can reach inside them. It performs the same function in the granulomas associated with tuberculosis so that antibiotics can reach the bacteria sheltering within. These drugs may be more useful in treating tuberculosis. The results show that several MMP inhibitors, including the FDA-approved drug Marimastat, improve the structural integrity of leaky blood vessels in tuberculosis granulomas, allowing antibiotics to penetrate them and attack the tuberculosis pathogens in mice more efficiently. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis enters the lungs, the immune system attempts to contain the bacterial colony by forming a lesion around it called a granuloma. Unfortunately, the bacteria have adapted to make these prisons more like homes.

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2019.03.28

Artificial Intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas

Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis, TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists. According to study co-author Paras Lakhani, MD, from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital (TJUH) in Philadelphia, there is a tremendous interest in artificial intelligence, both inside and outside the field of medicine. An artificial intelligence solution that could interpret radiographs for the presence of TB in a cost-effective way could expand the reach of early identification and treatment in developing nations.

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2019.03.28

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