The new tool to advance prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

New treatment may have fewer side effects than traditional cancer therapy

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing

Human gene therapy in a model of the rare metabolic disorder

Researchers are closer to finding a better way to treat children with a rare metabolic disorder called MPS I. It is caused by a deficiency of the key enzyme IDUA needed to break down complex sugars in cells. MPS I eventually leads to the abnormal accumulation of sugar debris and cell death. The two main treatments are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy; however, both are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease enters the central nervous system (lat. Systematis nervosi centralis, CNS).

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2019.03.18

Acticule: a treatment of infectious diseases

Acticule Life Sciences Limited (Acticule) is a spinoff of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), which focuses on novel drug discovery and clinical therapeutic development in infectious disease-related medical indications. The company was founded in 2017 by Mr Ian Huenand Dr Richard Kao. Acticule's major projects focus on antiviral and bacteria anti-virulence candidates and potential oral and injectable drugs. Acticule Life Sciences has a core team and principal investigators ("PI") with an outstanding reputation in the field of infectious diseases, as well as knowledge, track record, and broad network connections in Greater China and Asia.

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2019.03.18

A new method to regain sight with the help of gene therapy

A gene for a green-light receptor has been inserted by the researchers at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) into the eyes of blind mice and, a month later, they were navigating around obstacles as easily as mice with no vision problems. They were able to see motion, brightness changes over a thousandfold range and fine detail on an iPad sufficient to distinguish letters. Within as little as three years, the gene therapy - delivered via an inactivated virus - could be tried in humans who’ve lost sight because of retinal degeneration, ideally giving them enough vision to move around and potentially restoring their ability to read or watch a video.

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2019.03.18

A new class of potential anti-tuberculosis drugs

Bioengineering Team's 'Circuit' Work May Benefit Gene Therapy

Experimental Drug Stops Parkinson’s Disease Progression in Mice

Potential cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, according to the new research from the University of Illinois. Cystic fibrosis is a lifelong disease that makes patients vulnerable to lung infections. There are treatments for some but not all patients, and there is no cure. The drug restored infection-fighting properties in lung tissue donated by human patients as well as in pigs with cystic fibrosis. It has potential to become the first treatment to address all types of cystic fibrosis, regardless of the genetic mutation that causes the protein deficiency.

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2019.03.15

Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice

A gene therapy that blocks this process, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions has been developed by the scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL). The strategy could help prevent peripheral neuropathy, a disease that currently affects about 20 million people in the United States. Peripheral neuropathy can result from chemotherapy for cancer treatment or poorly controlled diabetes, and it causes persistent pain, numbness, burning, itching and muscle weakness.

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2019.03.15

Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development

A gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system (lat. systematis nervosi centralis) are insulated has been identified by the scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL). Healthy insulation is vital for the speedy propagation of nerve cell signals. The finding, in zebrafish and mice, may have implications for human diseases like multiple sclerosis, in which this insulation is lost. Nerve cells send electrical signals along lengthy projections called axons. These signals travel much faster when the axon is wrapped in myelin, an insulating layer of fats and proteins. In the central nervous system, the cells responsible for insulating axons are called oligodendrocytes.

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2019.03.15

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