Researchers identify brain protein crucial to recovery from stroke

Reducing the burden of tuberculosis treatment

Treatment more common neurological diseases

New gene therapy technique for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

A therapeutic technique to transplant blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells directly into the brain that could herald a revolution in the approach to treating central nervous system diseases and neurodegenerative disorders has been developed by the researchers at Children's Hospital Boston. The technique could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain. In their study, the team tested the technique in a mouse model to treat lysosomal storage disorders, a group of severe metabolic disorders that affect the central nervous system. 

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2019.03.14

Viral gene therapy could improve results from breast reconstruction after cancer treatment

A new type of gene therapy delivered using a virus that could protect healthy tissues from the harmful side-effects of radiotherapy after cancer (lat. Prostate Carcinoma) treatment has been discovered by the researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research. In the future, the treatment could be used to improve outcomes for breast reconstruction surgery in women with breast cancer - by protecting patients from scarring, shrinkage of the skin and damage to the underlying tissues. Scientists found they could prevent tissue damage in rats treated with radiotherapy by reprogramming healthy cells to protect themselves. Modern radiotherapy is increasingly precise and targeted, but even so, it can still cause a variety of side-effects to tissues including skin, fat and blood vessels, months or years after treatment.

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2019.03.14

Gene Therapy Shown to Remove Core Component of Parkinson’s Disease

An international team, led by Rush (RushUni) researcher Dr. Jeffrey Kordower, has moved a step closer to developing a treatment to clear brain cells of a protein that is an integral cause of Parkinson's disease (lat. Parkinson scriptor morbus). Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive movement disorder that affects the body's ability to control movement. The condition is a result of damage to brain cells that produce dopamine, a chemical that relays messages to the parts of the brain that control movement, resulting in trembling, stiffness, slow movement and poor balance and coordination. Working with rats induced with a simulation of Parkinson’s disease, the team showed that a genetically engineered fragment of an antibody - called a nanobody - cleared away toxic clumps of the protein alpha-synuclein after the team injected the nanobody into the rats’ brains.

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2019.03.14

Robust and specific gene regulation tool developed for primary brain neurons

Scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer

Biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer

Significant discovery in the fight against drug-resistant tuberculosis

A naturally occurring antibiotic that may help in the fight against drug-resistant Tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) has been identified by the scientists at Newcastle University (NewcastleUni). Each year, approximately 10 million people fall ill with Tuberculosis (TB) and around 1.7 million die from the devastating disease worldwide. One of the main antibiotics for TB is rifampicin, however, many strains of the Tuberculosis-causing bacteria - Mycobacterium tuberculosis - have developed resistance to it. Approximately 600,000 people every year are diagnosed with rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis. Now researchers from Newcastle University and Demuris Ltd have identified that a naturally occurring antibiotic, called kanglemycin A - related to the antibiotic rifampicin - is active against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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2019.03.13

Androgen affects the risk of being affected by prostate cancer

Professor Fahri Saatcioglu at University of Oslo's Department of Biosciences (IBV) heads a research group investigating how androgens – male sex hormones – affect the risk of being affected by prostate cancer. The researchers have been working extensively in the study of what is called intracellular signaling pathways in prostate cancer cells, and this basic research has now given promising results. They have shown that a new small molecule drug called MKC8866 has a very good effect on the growth of prostate cancer cells both in cell culture and in animal experiments.

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2019.03.13

A new antibiotic could be a better, faster treatment for tuberculosis

A new antibiotic that can find and kill tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) bacteria where they hide has been developed by the researchers at the University of Connecticut (UniConn). Tuberculosis is the number one cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. About 25 percent of people on the planet are currently infected. Most of those infections will stay dormant, but one in 10 will become active, infectious, and often fatal if untreated. Tuberculosis is caused by a bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Because of Mycobacterium's unique lifestyle, in which they allow themselves to be eaten by macrophage immune cells and then grow inside of them, they are very hard to treat. 

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2019.03.13

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