Biomarker discovery offers hope for new Tuberculosis vaccine

The novel biomarker for prostate cancer patients

Precision immunoprofiling could help reduce latent tuberculosis infection

Robo Mechanism in the treatment of neuropathological conditions

During brain development, billions of neuron nerve cells must find their accurate pathway in the brain in order to form trillions of neuronal circuits enabling us to enjoy cognitive, sensory and emotional wellbeing. To achieve this remarkable precision, migrating neurons use special protein receptors that sense the environment around them and guide the way so these neurons and their long extensions stay on the right path and avoid faulty turns. Rare defects in these neuronal guidance proteins can result in severe neurological conditions such as ataxia and epilepsy. Bar-Ilan University researchers led by Professor Yarden Opatowsky intricate molecular mechanism that allows the guidance receptor "Robo" to react to signals in its environment while avoiding premature activity that can lead to harmful outcomes.

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2019.03.11

Blood-based biomarkers could enable simple, accurate TB tests for diagnosis and monitoring

Researchers from Woodruff Health Sciences Center have identified novel blood-based biomarkers in patients with active tuberculosis (ATB) that could lead to new blood-based diagnostics and tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. The study was led by TB immunologist Jyothi Rengarajan, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (infectious diseases), Emory University School of Medicine and Emory Vaccine Center and Yerkes researcher, and Susan Ray, MD, Emory professor of medicine (infectious diseases) and Hospital Epidemiologist at Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital.

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2019.03.07

Experimental TB protection delivered through a spray instead of a shot

For years, scientists have been trying to come up with a better way to protect people against tuberculosis, the disease caused by infection with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria. Texas Biomedical Research Institute Professor Jordi Torrelles, Ph.D., says new hope is on the horizon after a recent experiment performed in mice showed great promise. The formulation of a vaccine protected better than the current vaccine and did not cause any lung tissue damage. If further research proves safety and effectiveness, the vaccine can be delivered directly into the lungs. 

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2019.03.07

A protein that may signal more aggressive prostate cancers

A new target to treat prostate cancer

Researchers uncover the potential key to curing tuberculosis

The scientists set sights on glaucoma medication to treat TB

A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis), even the drug-resistant kind. Robert Abramovitch, an MSU microbiologist, along with graduate student Benjamin Johnson who helped lead the study, have discovered that ethoxzolamide, a sulfa-based compound found in many prescription glaucoma drugs, actually turns off the bacterium’s ability to invade the immune system. TB may not have eyes and ears, but it has the uncanny ability to sense certain environmental cues in the body and adapt. One of these cues includes the infection’s ability to detect pH - or acidity levels - which tells the disease it’s being attacked by a host immune cell.

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2019.03.07

A novel pathway for a mucosal TB vaccine

A new pathway for improving vaccines against tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis) has been discovered by microbiologists at the University at Buffalo (UBuffalo) in collaboration with researchers at other universities. The new pathway was identified in animal studies using LT-IIb, a novel, mucosal adjuvant, developed by Professor Terry Connell, who has shown that LT-IIb dramatically boosts the potency of vaccines that are administered to mucous membranes. Adjuvants enhance the body’s immune response against an antigen. This research demonstrates that the most effective vaccination against TB should target the IL-17 pathway. This observation is in stark contrast to the importance of the IFN-γ and T helper 1 pathways in combating TB infection in the body, which have been the traditional targets for TB vaccines. 

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2019.03.07

Researchers discover two new ways to kill tuberculosis

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found two novel ways of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (lat. Phthisis, TB), a disease responsible for an estimated two million deaths each year. The findings could lead to a potent TB therapy that would also prevent resistant TB strains from developing. According to  William R.  Jacobs,  Ph.D., the study’s senior author and professor of microbiology & immunology and of genetics at Einstein, as well as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, this approach is totally different from the way any other anti-TB drug works. In the past few years, extremely drug-resistant strains of TB have arisen that can’t be eliminated by any drugs, so new strategies for attacking TB are urgently needed.

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2019.03.07

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